What is

What is Page Speed? – Definition, 6 SEO Best Practices

Page Speed Definition

Page speed frequently disorganizes with “site speed,” which its a sample of page views on a site.

And also it described in either “page load time” (the time it takes to display the content on the specific page fully).

And “time to first byte” and how long it takes for our browser to receive the first byte of information from the webserver.

We can evaluate our page speed with Google’s Page Speed Insights. Also, it insights speed Score incorporates data from CrUX (Chrome User Experience Report).

And reports on two essential speed metrics: First, Content full Paint (FCP) and DOM Content Loaded (DCL).

Why SEO Best Practices?

  • Google indicates site speed (and, as a result, page speed) is one of the signals used by its algorithm to rank pages.
  • Research shows that Google might precisely measure time to the first byte when considers it.
  • Also, the slow page speed means that search engines can crawl fewer pages using the allocated crawl budget, negatively affecting our indexation.
  • And also it crucial to user experience. Pages with longer load time tend to take higher bounce rates and lower average time on page.
  • Its longer load times also take it shows to affect conversions negatively. Here some of the many ways to increase our page speed.

1. Enable Compression

  • Gzip software application for file compression reduces the size of our CSS, HTML, and JavaScript files that more significant than 150 bytes.
  • Do not use on image files. Instead, compress in a program like Photoshop, where we can retain control over the image’s quality.

2. Minify CSS, JavaScript, and HTML

  • It’s optimizing our code (including removing spaces, commas, and other unnecessary characters). Also, remove code comments, formatting, and unused codes. Google recommends using CSSNano and UglifyJS.

3. Reduce Redirects

  • Individually, the page redirects to another page, and our visitor faces additional time waiting for the HTTP request-response cycle to complete.
  • For example, if our mobile redirect pattern looks like this: “example.com -> www.example.com -> m.example.com -> m.example.com/home,” each of those two additional redirects makes our page load slower.

4. Remove Render-blocking JavaScript

  • Browsers take to build the DOM tree by parsing HTML before they can render a page. If our browser encounters the script during this process, it must stop and execute it before continuing.

5. Leverage Browser Caching

  • Browsers cache its lot of information stylesheets, images, JavaScript files, and more. When visitors come back to our site, the browser doesn’t take to reload the entire page.
  • Use the tools like YSlow to see if we already take the expiration date set for our cache. Then put our “expires” header for how long we want that information to be cached.
  • In many cases, unless our site design changes frequently, the year is a reasonable period. Google takes extra information about leveraging caching here.

6. Improve Server Response Time

  • Our server response time affects by the amount of traffic we receive, the resources each page uses. And the software our server uses and the hosting solution you use.
  • It improves our server response time, looks for performance bottlenecks like slow database queries, slow routing. And the lack of adequate memory and fix them—the optimal server response time under 200ms.

Also Read: What is Mean by Paid Search? – Google Ads, Rules of Ad Ranking

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